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's the ultimate game of chicken. by the way, a new plan that works in taxing bank assets and even grabbing some money from the church. how about that. meanwhile, back here at home once again i'm going to stop this nonsense about a new national internet sales tax. my pal grover norquist will help me declare war on it. this is a big government tax grab that we will debate. >> speaking of taxes, guess who is not paying them? more and more federal workers are tax cheats. why shouldn't tax cheats just be fired? it's that easy on the "kudlow report." and we begin right now. first up tonight, the cyprus crisis continues. riots are forming in the streets. cnn's own chief international correspondent michelle caruso-cabrera is with us tonight. >> cyprus is going to do something that's called "resolving a bank." like all tough things in life, we use euphemisms. tonight the head of the central bank has asked parliament to give him permission to give him new powers of resolution authority. what he will do with that resolution authority is he will take cyprus's most troubled bank, he's going to take the good
shoppers, beware. you may get slapped with a new internet tax being handed down from capitol hill. that story, just ahead. >>> and later, giving new meaning to the term zombie economy. >> they see you as killers. they're training to attack. >> i'll tell you what, next time you see phillip, you tell him i'm going to take his other eye. >> the creator of "the walking dead," robert kirkman, attributes part of his show's success to the financial crisis. kirkman will join me later to explain. you're watching the "closing bell" on cnbc, first in business, worldwide. [ male announcer ] this is a reason to look twice. the stunning lexus es. get great values on your favorite lexus models during the command performance sales event. this is the pursuit of perfection. how do traders using technical analysis streamline their process? at fidelity, we do it by merging two tools into one. combining your customized charts with leading-edge analysis tools from recognia so you can quickly spot key trends and possible entry and exit points. we like this idea so much that we've applied for a patent. i
and businesses and consumers do not want to hear, it's a new tax on the internet. even downloads from ituness, who thinks that is a good idea? not me, here is good news "the kudlow report" begins right now. president obama in israel for the first same in his presidency, securing the relations with the allie in the middle east, here is what he had to say when greeted by benjamin netanyahu. it's in our fundamental security interest to stand with israel. it makes us both stronger and more prosperous and makes the world a better place. >> so question is, what exactly is the president hoping to accomplish in israel. here now we republican former u.s. ambassador and dan senor the coauthor of start up nation. joining me here on set for the hour, ryan grim, huff post washington bureau chief, and tony frato, former white house deputy press secretary. welcome to one and all, if i may go to you first, ambassador, there's all this media chatter that i'm reading today that president obama the not know what he wants to do and he has no agenda. it's said that he was the first u.s. president to visit israel
! >>> >>> the tiny island of cyprus sets off big scare with plans to set off the rule of law. they want to tax all bank depositors large and small to pay for a bailout. this has never happened before.e are in trouble. if nothing happens, optimism runs the show. cyprus is the money ground for dirty money from russia and other rogue nations. the government of cyprus is scared to death of insulting vladimir putin. we'll have an expert who will play this scenario out for us. "the kudlow report" begins right now. >>> first up, let's get the latest on the cyprus report. michelle joins us by phone. >> good evening. the details are changing, but the one core fact important to investors is true. for the first time ever in the european crisis, portions of bank accounts will be seized in order to pay for a bailout. cyprus agreed to this to get a 10 billion euro loan to bail out their banks. what is still unclear and controversial is whether insured deposits will also be seized. original plan was if you had an account in cyprus with less than 100,000 euros, would you have to pay a tax even though it falls bel
taxes and pay cuts, instead what they did was they taxed bank deposits. they're calling it a tax. a lot of folks are calling it a seizure. here's what's significant. even small depositors below the insurance threshold are going to get hit. the original number for small depositors below 100,000 euros was 6.5%. they're working in parliament right now about shifting that and any other subsequent plan suggests that if you have insured money it will still get hit. what did we see over the week whend this announcement happened on yesterday? runs on the atms at the banks in cypress because they'd shut down the banks as a result of this. they stopped all wire transfers and you also if you tried to take money out they had partitioned out the amount of money that you were supposed to be giveing to the government each though there hasn't been a vote in parliament. why did cypress need a bailout? its banks are bust. the reason the banks in sicypru they bet the greek debt would not be restructured but it was. that's left a lot of them insolvent. the banks in cyprus are huge, eight times the size of
a bank at tax plan. now the risks of bank runs and bank collapses mount in this tiny country. we are about to bring you live report from cyprus. but cyprus may have an ace in the hole. it's called russia. the parliament is going hat in hand to russia to save its financial system in return for ownership of its natural gas resources. so do i have this right? the russian money-laundering thugs can save cyprus and maybe europe and maybe the global financial markets as well? it's a very scary thought. however, here at home, american business leaders speaking in one voice in a new campaign to push pro growth corporate tax reform. i like it. the polls show it. there's too much talk about root canal, dent and budge cutting. we need growth, we need optimism. we need "the kudlow report." it begins right now. >>> first up this evening, let's go live to cnbc chief international correspondent, michelle caruso cabrera who joins us from cyprus with the details. good evening, michelle. >> reporter: good evening, larry. it's been a day of high drama here in cyprus. just a few hours ago, the parli
under $100,000 euros taxed 3% while savers over half a million will see the levy kred to 10%. those above the threshold pay 9.9% tax. the total revenue raised is expected to hold just shy of 6 billion euros. the rescue package is slated to begin today around 1500 cet. in the meantime, we're getting comment out of russia. seen as perhaps the targeted party here, i should say, with regard to some of the deposit taxes that are being pushed through on cipriot banks. for example, putin via spokesman has apparently called the levy, if approved, unfair, unprofessional and dangerous. european markets are in the red across the board as we've seen today. the ftse 100 down almost 1% and the xetra dax better than 1%. the ibex 35 is down 2%, roughly the same amount for the ftse mib. we can tell you that spanish and italian bonds have risen both on banks and for some of the periphery, showing pressure, as well. here is a look at some european banks. a mix there. on the left, you can see spain. banco santander down almost 4% some some cases. unicredit down almost 5%. moving to the french banks, cr
to the bottom of that? are we about to see a national internet tax, a tax on everything you buy online? it is on the hill today, and you need to see this report before your next click. and no more carrots. remember those thing. american tourist. you couldn't fit that in a carry-on if you tried. a major carrier experimenting with no more carry-s on. leave the luggage behind. you goat sit down first. it's a big change in the way america waits in line and flies away. sue is off today. simon is at the new york stock exchange. simon? >> and tyler, i'm slightly concerned for your european whack a mole you seem to have a very brutal hammer. let's move on and check where we are with the markets. after so many golden weeks of gains, it's been a little bit rough, but about 90 minutes ago we went positive. the dow went positive for the week. we were up over 90 points just shy of that, as you can see. let's have a look at where we are on the s&p right now. 1555 as we head into the weekend. we'll check on golds and brented a we work our way through the program. let's see what the mood of bob pisani
a bank deposit tax. sterling is trading lower as they get ready to set out this year's budget expecting to redirect spending to revive growth and deutsche bank lowers its earnings due to mortgage related lawsuits and/ regulator investigations. >>> plenty still happening as we follow the cyprus story for you and explore just what it means for investors across europe and around the world because the market reaction has been relatively muted if you consider the extraordinary nature of these events. cyprus' president is meeting with party leaders this morning after lawmakers last night unanimously rejected a proposed tax on bank deposits. this was crucial to unlocking a $10 billion bailout. the house speaker said the decision had been made for all europeans. >> this decision of the house of the republic of cyprus is protecting all the people of the countries of the european union and this is the main message i want to send tonight to all european citizens. >> now meanwhile cyprus' finance minister is appealing to moscow for help fresh from his talks with his counterpart this morning. discus
national debt, and even a bib llically based call r a flat tax. that's what i love. is he the conservative that can save the gop? here is the aforementioned dr. ben carson. director of the pediatric division at john hopkins university. and with us this hour, cnbc contributors keith boykin. as always, dr. carson, great to see you. i'm reading one of many articles that you're retiring in 100 days. i wonder if you would share future plans, especially public service. >> i have a lot of things on my agenda. i've got ten international trips. a multitude of speaking engagements around this country. we're working very hard with the college fund. we're in all 50 states. we're putting in reading rooms all around the country. particular particularly targeting title one schools. >> as you know, senator carl levin is retiring. any interest in that open senate seat? >> people keep trying to put me into politics. i don't believe i fit the mold. i don't believe in political correctness, and i certainly don't believe with getting into bed with special interest groups. i just don't believe i'd fit. >> how a
. the cypriot government says the country's parliament is unlikely to pass legislation which would impose a tax on bank deposits. lawmakers are set to meet and vote on the levy which has been set on a condition of the eu bailout. meanwhi meanwhile, the german finance minister has rushed to the defense of a highly unpopular tax. the move was necessary to keep cyprus from sharing in the burden of a eu bailout. and uncertainty over the outcome of the vote in nicosia continues to weigh on markets. cyprus said its stock exchange will trading until thursday. cypriot banks have been placed on negative watch. carolin roth is reporting now for us. the latest we're hearing is that the vote may not happen today. what can you tell us? >> absolutely. there are a lot of moving parts still, kelly. this is a very fluid situation. the vote is scheduled to happen at 6:00 p.m. local time. there has been no official cancellation on part of the government. but, again, a government spokesperson at the same time also saying that it's very unlikely at this point that the vote will actually go through. that is, of cour
because of that deposit tax component. now, the president is currently meeting with the leaders of the political parties. of course, what he's trying to do is to strong arm and to persuade them into voting for that deal because the other alternative, yes, that is bankruptcy for this country, which has only 1 million people and only makes up 0.2% of the entire eurozone. the debate and the vote on that bailout deal will be kicking off in around four hours from now at 4:00 p.m. local time. thou, a lot of uncertainty as to what the outcome of the vote will be, given that nobody has a clear majority. having said that, there is, of course, the chance that some of the lawmakers who have been wavering could have been appeased by the talk that some of the taxes for the smallest depositors could be lowered. now, "the wall street journal" has reported that those deposits between zero is and 100,000 euros could be taxed at only 3% as opposed to 6.75% previously. now, the middle bracket would be 100,000 to 500,000 euros. that could be taxed at 10% and then anything in excess of half a millio
premiums and insurance costs are rising sky-high. so are taxes. and small business costs are reducing profits by as much as 65% according to one small business owner we will talk to tonight. and the virtues of a free market capitalism that we talk about every night on this show are now forbidden fruit at stanford university. a popular long running pro capitalist course at that school has now been cancelled. what is up with that? "the kudlow report" begins right now. >>> first up, a major vote in the cyprus parliament helping to get that country closer to a teal with the european union. michelle caruso-cabrera joins us from cyprus again this evening with the very latest. good evening, michelle. >> reporter: larry, lawmakers here in cyprus taking a huge step tonight to prevent the financial collapse of their country. they pass ad law that will allow for the restructuring of their banks. this essentially means their sickest and largest banks will be down sized and made more healthy. this was a key demand by the european partners in order to secure a 10 billion euro bailout for the countr
is not just a tax haven for russia, it is the tax haven for russian millionaires and billionaires. russia has invested $119 billion, that's with a "brks" in cyprus in 2011 alone. that's by far the largest recipient of russian investments in the world. equal amount of investment came back to russia from cyprus. funny how that works. russian investment is five times the total economic output for cyprus. russians account for $20 billion of total bank deposits or, tyler, as you mentioned, more than a third among the top russians in cyprus is the fert cider magnet now the biggest shareholder in the bank of cyprus. he has a lot of money in u.s. real estate as well. he brought donald trump's mansion and his daughter bout an apartment in sandy well. and alexander bought avraz steel. the mystery to me is why these wealthy russians kept so much money in cyprus when they knew the banks were in trouble. one reason is that there are fewer choices. if you look around the world, governments arie cracking down n tax evasion and money laundering. they're all complying with global capitalist. even with this 10
to be? the monopoly man smoking a cigar? let's take a look at the euro. parliament voting to tax -- to not tax bank deposits. that's the latest word. a very fluid situation. much more on "closing bell" next. >> thanks very much for watching "street signs." stick with us. see you at the same time tomorrow. >>> hi, everybody. good afternoon. welcome to the "closing bell." i'm maria bartiromo at the new york stock exchange. the dow and the s&p 500 threatening to do something we haven't done all year. decline for three days in a row. >> shall we panic? i don't know what to do. i'm bill griffeth. stocks are lower. they've been lower all day. we've had just in the last few minutes here, to see if parliament rejected that one-time tax on bank deposits, which was a condition of its bailout plan. now investors are concerned maybe a default by cypress could intensify the euro zone's debt crisis. >> morgan stanley's adam parker, who had been negative says, no, no, no, i'm going to raise targets. in fact, one of the biggest bears turning bullish. why this market still has plenty of room to r
and, of course, old ideas are being revived, the idea of a depositit tax is coming back to the table. but we know, of course, just how unpopular that was. kelly. >> exactly. we seem to be almost back to where we started. carolin, thank you so much for that. carolin and steven both following these developments for us. >>> let's check on market reaction in asia. there's plenty going on in the world aside from cyprus. li sixuan joins us with the latest. eye, sixuan. >> thank you, kelly. markets in asia ending on a mixed note. there are lingering concerns over cyprus and north korean threats. political uncertainty in australia add add pressure on the markets. the asx 200 closed down 0.2% amid julia gillard's leadership. the main data point today was hsbc china flash pmi data for march, showing a rebound in the country's manufacturing activity. with concern, financial sector risks, housing bubbles and inflation, beijing may need to compromise growth to control medium term risks. the shanghai composite eked out a modest gain of 0.3%. in hong kong, the hang seng ended marginally lower ahead
with the plan to tax the bank accounts over there in cyprus. they are going to take a big hit. what might the russians do in response? you might not want to know. >> now, it was one of the hottest real estate markets in the united states and then one of the coldest. once again, it is hot. there is no room at the end or the condo. sue, doesn't miami sound pretty good right about now? >> it sounds so good right now. it's raining again in new york city. you mentioned at the top of the show, cyprus moving the markets up and down. new headlines from cyprus forced a selloff on wall street. we have recovered some of the those losses. we are still down 39 points, though. parliament is meeting now. bertha coombs is monitoring that from the breaking news desk. hi, bertha. >> they have been in session for about an hour now. they are expected to go at least another hour. here are the headlines as we've had them this morning. they are debating this bailout proposal and to a man so far, they are all saying no. the governing party, apparently, has prepared a one-day postpone meant on the vote because at
are losing due to this tax. >> hank smith, it is pretty extraordinary depositors have to pay for a bailout they didn't necessarily authorize. what do you think about what peter said? is this a recipe that would be used elsewhere in the world? >> i highly down it, maria. look, i think we should take great confidence in our banking system now compared to where we were four or five years ago. our banks are very healthy. t.a.r.p. was a good thing. it protected the financial system and the confidence in the financial system. and our banks are in great shape -- >> they're in the worst shape they've ever been. >> oh, no. >> they're a few interest rate hikes away from insolvency. that's why the fed is keeping rates at zero. >> wait a second. peter, you're saying the banks are a couple interest point ace way from insolvency? >> why to you think when the fed did the stress tests they didn't ask the banks to stress test a collapse in the bond market? they only looked at the stock market or maybe real estate. when interest rates rise substantially, the major banks are going to fail. their balance shee
a silicon valley insider and former yahoo coo daniel rosenzweig on the push for the sales tax. what impact will that have on retailers? you'll want to hear his answer this morning and first, why dollar general can make some sense for your portfolio and take one more look at futures this morning. looking at a pretty decent open for a short workweek this day as we have good friday off here. live from squawk on the street from post 9 when we return. your big picture. but e with the fidelity guided portfolio summary, you choose which accounts to track and use fidelity's analytics to spot trends, gain insights, and figure out what you want to do next. all in one place. i'm meredith stoddard and i helped create the fidelity guided portfolio summary. it's one more innovative reason serious investors are choosing fidelity. now get 200 free trades when you open an account. >>> shares of dollar general rising in pre-market tradex clueding items that yrms 97 cents a share, beating wall street forecasts and revenues essentially in line with the company benefiting from increased food sales and jimmy,
to tax bank deposits really royile the markets first thing this morn ing. cyprus? really. jane wells has been asking exactly that question on tw twitter. >> cyprus has a gross domestic product of $24 million. who are these people? we learned they really have a great sense of humor. one ad company parodied new york state of mind with state of mind. ♪ there's no toilets round, just a big hole in the ground ♪ >> see the whole hilarious video on my blog. how did one potential bank tax on an island give everybody a market wedgejy? i asked, it's like fill in the blank. here's responses. it's like a 20 buck battery grounding entire 787 fleet. an unpruned tree in ohio taking down the entire northeastern power grid. like a kim kardashian marriage. only lasts a short while and utterly meaningless. bloomberg banning large sodas. sailing a carnival ship and expecting to make it home. like me giving a rip about honey boo boo's next show. >> i love all of those. >> i liked them all till the last one. jane wells has clearly not redneckognized that's a hot show. >> when you have to subtitle white pe
meltdown. the parliament rejected an unprecedented tax on bank deposits. that was a key part of the eu bailout terms. the finance minister is in moscow today with mounting speculation that russia could step in with a safety plan to safeguard russian deposits in cyprus. steve sedgwick is in moscow where he caught up with the finance minister there an hour or so ago. steve? >> they turned to russians once again. there's a loan on the table from russians dating back from 2011 so it's not the exception to it the rule for the cypriots to turn to the russians. the russians themselves are indignant they weren't brought into talks. let's hear what he had to say earlier on about the state of the current talks. >> first meeting very constructive. very honest discussion. we underscored how difficult the situation is and we'll now continue our discussions to find a solution by which we hope we will get some support from russia. >> in terms of that support, are we talking about a change of terms for the current existing 2.5 billion euro loan and an extension of 5 billion loan in addition to that? >
and the latest deposit tax scheme. happy anniversary, apple dividend and it was a year ago when the tech giant announced its dividend in 17 years. will apple succumb to the bigger payout as it faces stiffer competition from samsung. lululemon doing the downward facing dog with the transparency with the iconic black yoga pants prompting the retailer to cut sales guidance and boeing clinches an order from ryanair. of course, we begin with the markets. the dow and the s&p 500 hoping to avoid their first three-day losing streak of the year. wall street will be paying close attention in about three hours from now. that country's parliament scheduled to vote on a proposed tax on bank deposits and the controversial measure appears set to go down in defeat. here in the u.s., policymakers begin a two-day meeting in which they're expected to hold current policy. this is one of the meetings where we will get a press conference and people will be hanging on every word and every use of every adjective coming out of the fed chairman's mouth. are you expecting anything? >> i think that, frankly, we are looki
going to go back to the original plan of taxing deposits. i am toll that's not going to be submitted to the troika. that may be the pipe dream of some in parliament. ladies and gentlemen, back to you. >> thanks, michelle. i was looking at the european bourses and i mean, if they can't sell off on this, and it's on -- you know, it's 0.2% of their economy and, you know, we're worried about whether there's any ripple all the way over to us. >> it may want be an instant market reaction, though. it may be something that's more of a concern about whether there would be other countries that step out of the eu. >> don't you think the markets could anticipate whether there would be further trouble or not? >> i don't know. i think this is -- >> we would be seeing it if it was really -- if they he can't sell off in europe, we shouldn't be looking at it at all for our markets here. >> no. michelle, what's that? >> i know you're over there, but you don't care. >> the one ripple effect i can think of is -- the one ripple effect i can think of is that if when they wind down this bank, there's some
taxes on the wealthy, put through a payroll tax increase, entitlements. we've got two out of three going. we had the president and congress raising taxes on the wealthy. i don't think bernanke wants to be the fed of 1937 because the recession came back aggressively and it was only world war ii that made the hiring come back. he doesn't want to be the guy -- he'd rather be second-guessed by all the bears who come on and say he's got to tighten because my short positions aren't making any money. he's not responding to the people who are short. he's actually responding to the american people. old-fashioned kind of guy. >> in terms of the reaction in the markets after the ben bernanke news conference, was that surprising at all that, for whatever reason, for whatever he said, the markets managed to rise and actually reached the highs of the day afterwards? >> i think there were a lot of people who expected that he would put in some language that just says, we're not going to keep rates low indefinitely because we see real estate, affordability is fantastic. you pick up the front page of the
's a tax. so theoretically, authorities have the authority to actually collect taxes on whatever. except it is being perceived as an ex appropriation of the savings. so -- but this is cypriot. this is a cyprus problem. don't extend it to the euro. the euro is not in danger because of what's happening in cyprus. nothing is going to happen to the financial system of the world because of what's happening in cyprus. we haven't had very enlightened series of decisions. since greece. and then we've bumbled a little bit, we've tumbled and is bumbled with spain and italy and now this cypriot thing is going to need a better design. >> so what is the design? what's the reasonable solution? >> well, one of the things is you don't have to affect the people who are below a certain threshold. now they're thinking about 20,000 or 50,000, whatever the threshold is. the conventional threshold used to be 100,000, but it doesn't have to be the case. the question is here. you really have to, you know, critters of the financial system have to take losses. you cannot make it a point. and this is the biggest m
,000 in the bank entirely to those under 100,000 and to keep the tax at 9.9% for those above 100,000 euros in their accounts. if it doesn't sound much different from the original plan, it's not. it basically exempts those with less than 20,000. on the back of that, we did see markets weak. elsewhere, there has been a weakening, but realively contained one. the ftse mib in italy is down 0.3%. the xetra dax is down by 0.5%. france is weaker. the ftse, as well, down about 0.25%. not too far off the levels we've seen this morning. german economic sentiment did come in roughly in line with expectations, so that helps to keep the bid in the euro, as well. here is the different between spain and italy. italy's ten-year selling off a bit. yield up to 4.66%. spain rallying. it did go to market with three nine-month yields this morning. still below 5%. i mentioned what was happening with the euro. let's take a look now as it continues to go through the different pieces of economic data we're getting this morning. it's still down about 0.11%. yesterday, it was actually stronger. so markets generally
from the social security tax increase and the cross the board spending cuts that went into effect on march 1st? and is it possible that the fed might see a need to provide more support to the economy, if that -- because of that drag, the drag on fiscal. >> well, our analysis is fairly comparable to analysis that congressional budget office as presented to the congress. and they estimate that putting together all the fiscal measures, including the fiscal cliff deal, the sequester, and other cuts, that federal fiscal restraint in 2013 is cutting something like 1.5 percentage points off of growth. which, of course, is very significant. so that is an issue for us. we -- you know, we take as given what the fiscal authorities are doing. the economy is weaker, job creation is slower than it would be otherwise. and so that is one of the reasons that our policy has been as aggressive as it is. that being said, as i've said many times, monetary policy cannot offset a fiscal restraint of that magnitude. and so the final outcome will be worse, or in terms of jobs, than would have been the cas
at conocophillips. >> there's an opportunity to generate a couple of trillion of dollars in tax revenue over the next 20 years. there's opportunity to generate millions of additional jobs. >> well, believe it or not, joining us right now is former nfl quarterback drew bledsoe. he's an investor in a company called ecosphere, which is making a big bet on fracking, and more specifically, drew, it's about the cleaning of the water that's used in the fracking process. it's an environmentally clean process, which has a lot of people worried about the impact fracking has on the environment. this is a possible solution, i guess, yes? >> it is, exactly. i help lead an investment group and funded some brilliant scientists down in florida actually a few years ago. our technology uses no chemicals. we actually in the past since 2008, we've cleaned over 2.8 billion gallons of water, which has eliminated 1.3 million gallons of chemicals. we allow these companies to, first of all, clean the water before they use it the first time, and then also recycle it and reuse it in their process. so we're closing the
on a positive note when something like bank deposits will be taxed as a way to raise money. they don't understand why investors here like you and me aren't more worried that the authorities there are willing to risk bank runs in spain or italy because of this hair-brain scheme. at this stage they would gladly pay for rioters in the streets of cyprus if we can get the media to accentuate today and link cyprus to the rest of europe and the united states, even if the european authority recognize that is the issue is that banks are safe havens for russian laundered money! the short sellers, they would at least pay cash for the numbers to line up. once they get some runs going leads me to the simple conclusion that intellectually short-sellers will do the best to say whatever resolution is arrived at or not arrived at, we have got the dreaded are you ready scheme daddy lehman brothers on our hands! wow. yes, they are envoking lehman. that's what they're doing. why lehman brothers? because you know what? lehman is code for thermal nuclear financial war. it was the line drawn in the sand be
people and middle class people that use cyprus because of the rule of law, common law, the double tax treaties we have. it's a mistake to think that it is a very special class, of very rich people. these russians have their lawyers, their accountants, many of them have their families living in cyprus. they have their friends. we have a relationship that can with stand a shock like this. >> bearing that in mind, are the banks going to open on tuesday morning? >> i cannot say that. i cannot say that. it's always a mistake to say something like this when you are not completely sure. there is a lot of work to be done. but they will open very soon. >> and how long do you intend to use the capital controls? >> that also i cannot answer. but, again, our objective to keep them as limited and as short as possible. >> and finally, you bypassed the democratic process of a parliamentary vote with this field. will you consider tendering your resignation when you get back to cyprus? >> no, no, we did not bypass the poll. we passed a number of laws two nights ago. we have kept party leaders ip forms
tomorrow morning. there's still no plan here. in fact, you heard about plan a which was to tax deposits. now we have heard that plan b has been rejected by the troika as well. cyprus government said to the troika, their european partners who they want them to lend money to, they said to them, listen, instead of taxing deposits why don't we do this instead. we have a pension fund, we'll raid it, take the cash, turn it into bond and we'll pay it back over time. the troika said that doesn't do anything for you. you still have liabilities. then they said we're also going it try to sell one of the bad banks. and the fact of the matter is if the bad bank were sellable, people like chris flowers and wilbur ross and tim collins would have been here a long time trying to buy it. they said maybe we'll split it up, divide it into the good bank and bad bank. we'll sell the good bank to the russians and the troika said selling the good bank is the easy part. what are you going to do with the bad bank? none of that is going to work. you will hear more about what the hopes are for russia from steve in
tax on the large depositors which would lead to a tax of around 15% or 16%. or they can basically restructure their two bad banks. it would be very simple to do that. what would happen is the banks would write off all their equity, write-off their senior debt, write-off their dpovt subordinated debt. and then the large depositors would president owners of the new bank and convert. >> narrator: between 50% and 30% of their new depositors in the banks. >> could they say we don't want to do anything of those? >> certainly they can choose to do that. i don't think that's necessary. basically, if they do nothing, and the ecb carries through with its policy of cutting off liquidity on monday, they will have no choice but to restructure the two banks. >> are you surprised to see lines forming? >> no. depositors are frightened for their money. they've been told there's a high likelihood of the banks closing and staying closed for a period of time. in fact, the lines are not as long as i would have expected them. >> wow. interesting 30i7b9. i had a discussion with simon hobbs, my colleague
, which is to tax depositors below 100,000 euros. exactly one week later, that idea is completely dead. it's not going to happen. however, if you have uninsured deposits, over 100,000 euros in either one of the two banks that are going to be restructured, you are going to suffer severe losses, anywhere between 30% and 70% depending on which bank. equity goes to zero. junior bondholders to zee he row. senior bondholders for the most part to zero depends on the bank. what's the impact for investors? if you are an investor in european banks, you are on notice. every single bailout that has happened, your protection has diminished step by step by step. this is by design. it is europe's stated goal that by 2018 bailouts will not be a burden of the taxpayer. they will be born by the private sector and the investors in the questionable institutions. these banks will likely see interest rates rise as a result of this, maybe the countries that they're in. the question is, is this going to cause broader risk or force discipline and responsibility or both? >> additionally, european decision making on
to collect sales tax from all out of state internet retailers will take place in the senate today. inevitably, it has a lot of support from the big box retailers in particular. let's bring in john harwood who is live from d.c. though this may just be a symbolic vote, weir to are told john. >> symbolic, but not meaningl s meaningless. it's a spring training of sorts to test opinion within congress on various causes. we saw a vote yesterday on the budget resolution, on the repeal of a medical device tax that was included to help finance the national health care law in the early part of the obama administration. the reason it's spring training is that budget resolutions themselves are not lost. so these are not binding votes, but they're a way to test sent ims for what they make later on and that's what we're seeing on the online sales tax situation. 48 states already have laws on the books requiring online retailers to collect state sales tax, but those laws are often ignored and you have a bill that has some bipartisan support that would require all states to collect those taxes. if split, th
of that whole business, in terms of taxing depositors, and we know that we continue to have issues in terms of the debt crisis. we are not, necessarily, seeing solutions there. >> i think you see -- if that fear were true, you would see it reflected in the peripheral european countries. i think they mark scyprus as a special case. >> mark, how are you investing at this point? you've got $54 million under management there. you've been bullish. do you want to put new money to work here, even though the market is up 10% year-to-date? >> short answer, yes, maria. the fact of the matter is, we think the fundamental underpinnings, particularly domestically, continue to be encouraging, and we're encouraging investors as a result of some of the volatility we've had in non-u.s. equity markets, to begin the scale-in there as well, because we think valuations are even more attractive. but i do think this cypresicyprg could be a big deal. the precedent it could set relative to marketdowns of small account deposits in other peripheral countries, particularly spain and italy. and the last thing we need t
life trying to figure out how to transfer wealth and not have taxes and all of that so there can be a dynasty of all kinds of little buffetts going around for hundreds of years never having to do anything. >> but don't cry for those little buffetts. howard, his brother, peter, and sister, susan, have gotten multimillion-dollar gifts of money and berkshire hathaway stock from their parents. so while he's not on the fortune 500, howard is by any measure a wealthy man. on top the outright gifts, each buffett child is getting $1 billion to go toward their philanthropy. but all that pales next to the $31 billion that's going to the gates foundation. so did you know, as far back as you can remember, that you were not going to inherit his money? >> yeah, yeah. >> you've sort of always known that as you were growing up? >> yeah. and from time to time, that was a little frustrating. >> 'cause you wanted it, or what do you mean? >> well, i just mean, you know, you feel like that there are a lot of things you could do if you had more money. and i think that way even in the foundation. >> bu
about cyprus and the atm bank lines and the tax scheme where they essentially bang the depositors for money. they violated the sacrosanct compact, i told him, that was meant to protect those deposits. stewart's all about common sense. he didn't think all of that much about the cyprus story. more importantly, he was hoping we wouldn't make too of it on this show because it would blow over since cyprus was a special case that couldn't easily be extrapolated and maybe even rally a little. then i went home after having some breakfast and i set out to study the charts and more on this later and settled in for serious ncaa bracketology while watching the canes play the tar heels. i tried to stay focused on march madness but i began to get bombarded by emails from bears worldwide -- [ shots fired ] brown bears, kodiaks, even koalas, telling me, this is it, jim, this is the big kahuna that i was being way too glib about the confiscation scheme that would rock my world. i knew not to dismiss the darn cyprus situation. i actually bothered to argue back, silly me. first i offered the standar
>> washington raised income taxes on the wealthy. >> boo! >> took the top marginal rate to the astounding 75% and instituted a 2% payroll tax for social security. their goal? they wanted to start trying to balance the budget because the president and treasury secretary were worried about the long term deficit? does that sound familiar? at the exact same time, the fed tightened rates, doing what all the bears say bernanke should do, betting that inflation could rage and rage easily if the fed stayed easy, which is what his critics are saying he should do right now. but when we went down this road in 1937 it sent the economy into an amazing tail spin. causing a recession within a depression. it was an economic calamity that was totally avoidable if the people in power made different, smarter choices. especially the federal reserve. ben bernanke does not want history to repeat itself. he's not going down the path of what the fed did in 1937. he's not stupid. even though that's exactly the path unfortunately that the president and congress are taking. bernanke recognizes that obama and congress
allows pinnacle to usist losses to cancel out the taxes they might owe for profits down the road. the corporate income tax bill will be tiny and nonexistent for years to come. there is another reason they get a higher valuation and that's growth. b&g has been growing sales consistently while pinnacle sales have been flat. the valuation disparity with b&g, let's say pinnacle deserves to trade 1.5 times sale. still a big discount to b&g. it would make this a $30 stock which is 50% higher than the high end of pinnacle's price range. i think $30 is a reasonable tashgt. especially since they are making smart moves. they are cutting costs. management is doing a terrific job. they made a conference call acting like they were a public company. the environment seems to be improving. pinnacle can do another acquisition. the company is paying you to wait to get their house in order with that great dividend. let's not forget, last week ken powell was on the show, he told us food inflation has peaked and competition is less fierce? that could help. pinnacle foods reminds me of long-time "mad
is it that allowed or condoned or suggested the idea that the lower threshold of 100,000 euros should be taxed? >> listen to the statement out of the european commission. one of the myriad of bureaucrats in brussels. the commission made it clear in the euro group meeting before and they capitalized before, the vote in the cypriot government that an alternative solution would be acceptable and preferably one without a levy on deposits below 100,000. the cypriots did not accept such an alternative scenario and they squarely placed the blame on the guys in the parliament building behind me. so we'll see what happens. the breaking point is at some point we're not going to keep stuffing the atms with money. and they'll have to figure it out and close down some banks, et cetera. >> i respect the detail that you've been through, but this market clearly believes that the deal will get done and the banks will get propped up with international aid. we're up 72 points on the dow. nobody in the market appears to be worried about it and we haven't seen a big move on bonds today. how do you reconcile that w
after its parliament rejected an international bailout package that would have taxed savers and depositors. michelle caruso-cabrera is on the ground right now. she joins us live with the very latest from cyprus. over to you, michelle. >> reporter: hey, there, maria. the very latest that the cyprus plan tried in part trying to raid a pension fund. cash in the pension fund used now and promising to pay the workers later. but their european partners said, no, that's not going to work, because all you're going to do is defer liabilities. it doesn't help your debt profile. so we don't like that. now they're working on plan "c." the question is, what is that? here's the very latest, the bank holiday, as a result of all of this indecision and inaction has been extended and now it looks like the banks will not open until tuesday of next week, a full week without the banking system operating. the minister of finance is in russia, trying to square away a deal there. we haven't had any good results from there. and then very, very worrisome, a member of the ecb talking even tougher late
up, when they originally, why don't you tax depositors. this reduces that. secondly, it also protects everybody under 100,000 euros. everybody in both banks stays protected underneath the insurance threshold. now, who's going to end up getting taxed, levied, taking a haircut, anybody who's got over 100,000 euros in the account. they're going to probably suffer on-paper losses of 30 to 40%, maybe 50%. for that, they'll be given stakes in a new bank, in the new bank that will hopefully over time give them money or the wind-down of the assets of the old bank, the bad bank will pay them off over time. that's the situation. the employees are angry because they're worried they're going to lose their jobs. it's quite possible, because once you have two banks come together, what do you do? you get rid of branches, you have synergies in employment as the institution merges the together. the employees here are very, very angry about what they've heard. >> it's not the family. it's germany and other countries. they are not our friends. >> you want to leave the euro? >> yeah, of course. >> we are
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